Categories

Cookery Courses

View our range of short and long Bath-based vegetarian and vegan cookery courses running throughout the year.

View cookery courses

Gift Vouchers

Buy gift vouchers for our vegetarian and vegan cooking courses in our online shop.

Buy a gift voucher today
 

Twitter

Vedgeree: Vegan Kedgeree

Kedgeree is a colonial adaptation of the Indian dish ‘khichhari’, traditionally made with rice and smoked fish. This is our scrumptious vegan version and, as a rice dish, it's also gluten free. We recommend serving with poppadoms (also vegan and gluten free) and mango chutney (recipe below). 

There's a few steps to this recipe but it's well worth the efforts. Here's couple of top tips before you get started: 

  • The best way to cook poppadoms is to fry them in a little oil or grill them. To grill, brush them first with oil and be very careful they don’t burn. My favourite variety is black pepper. They also come in garlic, chilli and plain. 
  • Soaking the yellow peas or Chana dhal overnight will reduce the cooking time. Try substituting the yellow peas for chickpeas or any whole lentils. Note: red lentils are not suitable, as they would turn mushy.

Kedgeree: Vegan Kedgeree

Dietary: Vegan, Gluten Free | Serves: 4

Ingredients:

  •  250g brown basmati
  • 150g yellow split peas or Chana dhal
  • 2-3 tbsp sunflower oil, ghee or coconut oil
  • 1 medium onion, finely chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, finely chopped
  • 30g fresh turmeric root, peeled and finely minced or grated or 1 ½ tsp ground
  • 4 cardamom pods
  • 4 cloves
  • 1 stick cinnamon
  • 600 ml vegetable stock or water
  • 150g peas, fresh or defrosted frozen
  • 250g fresh baby spinach
  • Salt and pepper
  • 30g flaked almonds, toasted
  • fresh coriander

Method:

  1. Rinse the rice well in a sieve and set aside to drain.
  2. Place the split peas and 10g of the fresh turmeric or ½ tsp ground turmeric in a small saucepan half filled with cold water, and bring to a boil on a high heat. Remove any frothy scum that rises to the surface with a slotted spoon. Reduce the heat to a simmer, and cook for approx 25-30 minutes until only just tender but not mushy. Drain and set aside.
  3. While the split peas are cooking, heat the oil or ghee in a saucepan and fry the onion till soft and translucent. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute.
  4. Gently crush open the cardamom pods with the back of a knife or in a pestle and mortar, then add to the onions with the cloves and cinnamon. Stir for a few seconds to release their aromas.
  5. Add in the remaining turmeric and the rice, and stir to ensure all the grains are coated in the oil, taking care not to let it catch and burn. You may need a little more oil at this stage.
  6. Pour in the stock or water, and increase the heat until the rice comes to a boil.
  7. Once boiling, reduce the heat to low to medium and allow the rice to simmer with a lid partially covering until the liquid is just covering the rice. At this point, place the lid fully covering the pan and turn the heat to its lowest. Cook for a further 10 minutes and then switch off the heat and leave the rice to continue steaming with the lid on for 10 minutes.
  8. In a large frying pan, heat 1 tablespoon of oil or ghee, and add the spinach. When it is half wilted, add the rice, split peas and green peas. Fold the rice through the vegetables and peas, then season with the lemon juice and salt and pepper to taste.
  9. Garnish with coriander leaves and the toasted almonds and serve with fresh Mango Chutney (see recipe below).

Mango Chutney

Ingredients

  • 1 mango, peeled and cubed
  • 1 red chilli, sliced
  • 1 tbsp lime juice
  • 1 tsp kalonji seeds (nigella)

Method

Mix the mango with the chilli and lime juice to taste and sprinkle on kalonji seeds. 


Delicious food photography by Rob Wicks of Eat Pictures.

Find us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram where we are chatting about all things foodie and, if you like this post, please share it!

To keep up to date with events and goings on at the cookery school sign up for our newsletter.

Comments